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Topic Title: Using a Mobile Athlon64 in a desktop system
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Created On: 05/24/2005 09:46 PM
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 05/24/2005 09:46 PM
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domicron
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Posts: 1
Joined: 05/22/2005

When it comes to building a desktop system, the mobile Athlon 64 can be a very attractive solution.

Afterall, it consumes less power (not important for a desktop) and subsequently produces less heat (good for any system). And, it comes with a full 1 MB of L2 cache as opposed to its desktop counterparts 512 KB.

As if that was not enough, I found the mobile chip to be priced roughly $10 to $15 CHEAPER then the desktop version. To me, I could see no reason not to get the mobile chip - and that is why I am here writing this short guide for all of you.

If you are looking for overclocking tips, look elsewhere. This is an install guide.

Now I know what your thinking, you've built a ton of systems before, what is so special about mounting a mobile Athlon 64? I mean, afterall, its just a simple matter of dropping the processor into the ZIF socket and dropping the lever, no?

That's what I thought at least.

What they don't tell you is that the mobile chip is THINNER then its desktop cousin, and thus is not tall enough to make proper contact with the standard socket 759 / 939 compatible heatsink.

As you might have guessed, that is a huge problem. One that I did not realize for two days - you see, I thought it was a malfunction in the Cool N Quiet implementation of the motherboard. This is what is suppose to automatically throttle the CPU based on need. I first noticed that the CPU would not run above 800mhz (it was an Athlon 64 3000, so should have been roughly 2.1 ghz), even under what should have been heavy load. After tinkering, I happened to glance at the processor temperature and was astounded to see 60 C on a cold boot in the BIOS temperature reading.

After much searching, I stumbled across a post somewhere on this great internet that stated that the mobile chip would not work with a stock heatsink without heavy modification. Of course, they gave no indication of what that modification should be, so I just sort of had at it.

Before I layout what must be done, just please realize that this was the second mobile 64 desktop system I put together. The first being my own, which went together without incident. The reason for this is because I splurged and bought a THERMALRIGHT XP-90 heatsink. It retails for about $50 on Newegg, and comes with its own custom mounting bracket that works just fine.

So, to use a normal socket 759/939 heatsink with the mobile chip, you must do a little work.

Start by unscrewing the heatsink mounting bracket from the motherboard. Should be two fairly large screws securing it.

Then, get yourself an industrial razor, or if you don't have one handy, you can do as I did and just use a flathead screwdriver.

Examine the bracket - you'll notice four nubs; one in each corner that the heatsink sits upon. Depending on the motherboard, you may also notice two more nubs placed on the interior sides of the bracket.

All of these nubs must be eliminated. I found that using my flathead screwdriver, I was able (with considerable force) to scrape all these nubs completely off. While you should take care not to crack or break the bracket, you must use a good amount of pressure and be sure to shave off all signs so that the heatsink sits flush with the actual bracket. The more shaving, the better.

Then, screw the mount back onto the motherboard, and place your heatsink back on.

It took me two rounds of scraping to get it right - but the difference is drastic. Instantly went from a 50-60 C coldboot, all the way down to 30 C.

Once the chip was properly cooled, I'm happy to say that everything fell into place and the processor has performed beautifully since.

KUDOS to AMD for making this processor so heat tolerant - lord knows I must have had it at 85-90 C at times before I realized what the problem was.


Hope someone finds this helpful, as I had a [content edited] of a time finding any information stating any of this!
 12/23/2007 06:56 AM
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jdesan
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Posts: 4
Joined: 03/10/2007

Saw your post. even though it's from 95 it pertains to what I'm trying to do i.e.

run a Mobile Sempron on a Desktop. I also have the same problem you experienced (system running at half speed) but it has nothing to do with heat. According to the BIOS the CPU temp is at 20 C even after hours of being on. I'm
using a $8.00 Coolermaster Fan/Heatsink


So, I guess I'm wondering what else could be causing my Chip to run so slow?

It's a Sempron smn3000bkx2bx in a ECS 755 A2 M/B

BIOS Settings:

The Manual states "M/B Automatically setsClcok Frequencey and BUS for CPU"

The only other option/settings are:

Dram Configuration

CURRENTLY
HT Width = AUTO OR 8 BITS 16 BITS
HT SPEED = 800 MHZ OR 600, 400, 200
MAX MEM CLK = AUTO OR 100, 133, 166, 200
CAS LATENCY = AUTO OR 2.0 2.5 3.0

FREQUENCEY/VOLTAGE

CURRENTLY
AUTO DETECT PCI CLK = AUTO OR DISABLE
SPREAD SPECTRUM = ENABLED OR DISABLE
CPU CLK = 200 MHZ OR 200 TO 255 MAX
DIMM VOLTAGE = 2.6

COOL n QUIET = AUTO OR DISABLE

CPUZ says the BUS is 200 but the Multiplier is 4X and HT 800

Any Ideas? Thanks for any tips.

You can also respond to micro279@zoominternet.net
 12/23/2007 12:51 PM
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MD - Moderator
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Posts: 11102
Joined: 11/05/2003

What they don't tell you is that the mobile chip is THINNER then its desktop cousin, and thus is not tall enough to make proper contact with the standard socket 759 / 939 compatible heatsink.


Okay... already knew this, as do a lot of other people here...

MSI has been making mainboards for both desktop & mobiles and they also have a shim for mobile applications.

-------------------------
The opinions expressed above do not represent those of Advanced Micro Devices or any of their affiliates.

Physics? Ha! This is clearly magic and devilry at work. Prepare firewood! We have witches to burn!


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 02/03/2008 06:03 PM
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norma089
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Posts: 16
Joined: 02/03/2008

Interesting post

Originally posted by: domicron

When it comes to building a desktop system, the mobile Athlon 64 can be a very attractive solution.

Afterall, it consumes less power (not important for a desktop) and subsequently produces less heat (good for any system). And, it comes with a full 1 MB of L2 cache as opposed to its desktop counterparts 512 KB.

As if that was not enough, I found the mobile chip to be priced roughly $10 to $15 CHEAPER then the desktop version. To me, I could see no reason not to get the mobile chip - and that is why I am here writing this short guide for all of you.

If you are looking for overclocking tips, look elsewhere. This is an install guide.

Now I know what your thinking, you've built a ton of systems before, what is so special about mounting a mobile Athlon 64? I mean, afterall, its just a simple matter of dropping the processor into the ZIF socket and dropping the lever, no?

That's what I thought at least.

What they don't tell you is that the mobile chip is THINNER then its desktop cousin, and thus is not tall enough to make proper contact with the standard socket 759 / 939 compatible heatsink.

As you might have guessed, that is a huge problem. One that I did not realize for two days - you see, I thought it was a malfunction in the Cool N Quiet implementation of the motherboard. This is what is suppose to automatically throttle the CPU based on need. I first noticed that the CPU would not run above 800mhz (it was an Athlon 64 3000, so should have been roughly 2.1 ghz), even under what should have been heavy load. After tinkering, I happened to glance at the processor temperature and was astounded to see 60 C on a cold boot in the BIOS temperature reading.

After much searching, I stumbled across a post somewhere on this great internet that stated that the mobile chip would not work with a stock heatsink without heavy modification. Of course, they gave no indication of what that modification should be, so I just sort of had at it.

Before I layout what must be done, just please realize that this was the second mobile 64 desktop system I put together. The first being my own, which went together without incident. The reason for this is because I splurged and bought a THERMALRIGHT XP-90 heatsink. It retails for about $50 on Newegg, and comes with its own custom mounting bracket that works just fine.

So, to use a normal socket 759/939 heatsink with the mobile chip, you must do a little work.

Start by unscrewing the heatsink mounting bracket from the motherboard. Should be two fairly large screws securing it.

Then, get yourself an industrial razor, or if you don't have one handy, you can do as I did and just use a flathead screwdriver.

Examine the bracket - you'll notice four nubs; one in each corner that the heatsink sits upon. Depending on the motherboard, you may also notice two more nubs placed on the interior sides of the bracket.

All of these nubs must be eliminated. I found that using my flathead screwdriver, I was able (with considerable force) to scrape all these nubs completely off. While you should take care not to crack or break the bracket, you must use a good amount of pressure and be sure to shave off all signs so that the heatsink sits flush with the actual bracket. The more shaving, the better.

Then, screw the mount back onto the motherboard, and place your heatsink back on.

It took me two rounds of scraping to get it right - but the difference is drastic. Instantly went from a 50-60 C coldboot, all the way down to 30 C.

Once the chip was properly cooled, I'm happy to say that everything fell into place and the processor has performed beautifully since.

KUDOS to AMD for making this processor so heat tolerant - lord knows I must have had it at 85-90 C at times before I realized what the problem was.


Hope someone finds this helpful, as I had a [content edited] of a time finding any information stating any of this!
 07/29/2010 03:14 AM
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jackson1426
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Posts: 1
Joined: 05/28/2010

hey guys im planning to upgrade my psc from a sempron 2500+ to a SMS3000BQX2LF and i need some advice to if it would work the board is a k8upgrade vm800 socket 754 please and thanks in advance

-------------------------
matthew
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