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Topic Title: Basic questions about unlocking core(s) and overclocking
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Created On: 01/23/2010 06:09 AM
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 01/23/2010 06:09 AM
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Seryat
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I am trying to understand some concepts after reading about unlocking cores and overclocking.

1. With the appropriate chipset, CPU and settings, can all extra cores potentially be enabled on that CPU?

2. If some cores cannot be enabled at all, why not?

3. If some unlocked cores are not stable, why are they able to be unlocked? In otherwords, why not just make the unstable but unlockable cores unable to be used at all, like the cores that can't be unlocked.

What seems confusing to me is that some cores seem not able to be unlocked at all, yet some cores can be enabled that are unstable.

4. How much risk is there that using unlocked cores will cause my system to be less stable in a few weeks or months after stress testing.

Also,

5. When overclocking say an Athlon II X2 620 and 630, can both potentially reach the same overclocked frequency? (e.g., 3.8 GHz)

6. Why not just buy a Athlon 620 and overclock it to the same frequency as a 630 or to the same frequency you want the 630 running at (e.g. 3.4GHz)

Finally,

7. When unlocking "hidden" cores, does that lower the potential maximum stable oveclocking frequency for all cores at once?


Any help clarifying and/or quantifying this is really appreciated.

Thanks.
 01/25/2010 04:31 AM
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slaveondope
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1. Yes with an ACC enabled board.
2. Cores were defective due to manufacturing error
3. With making anything some F*** ups are worse than others and hinder functionality like a motor it might run but not as intended or not at all. The bad cores are made not to be used. ACC is a trick to get around the disablization. Some good 4 core cpu's just end up disabled to meet demand for 2 and 3 core cpus while all 4 cores that had bad cores get disabled and sold as 2 and 3 core cpus. This allows product not to go to waste.
4. If a core is unlocked and proves stable in the beginning most likely it will remain not to say its not impossible to become corrupt even good 4 cores sold as 4 cores can go bad though I havent experienced it.
5. Athlon 620' are hitting 3.8ghz and more if you are comparing them to a black editionX3 it will be more envolved to reach these speeds with Athlon.
6. I personally bought a 620 for $10~$20 less than a 630 overclockers either make cheap parts work like better ones or buy the best to make the absolute best its personal choice. The higher multiplier of the 630 which is 14 makes it more appealing if you have concerns or know that your memory or motherboard does not work at high FSB speeds. The stock FSB is 200mhz on AMD's and then is multipied 200x14=2800mhz for 630's.
7. Yes and No again the reason the 4 core was demend defective may have been due to just one core not meeting AMDs tolerances thus gets turned into a 3. With AMD through my experience you almost always can bet on overclocking atleast 25% with even basic motherboards and memory. Through observation of others with X2's/X3's they usually seem to be able to clock higher on the orginal number of cores. This may due to heat issues because when unlocking cores one usually has to increase the voltage for them to become stable but this usually puts the chip at the same voltage as its 4 core counterpart. Then yet again voltages increase with the high clock speeds as well but it would seem that it would be no different than its 4 core brother. Basically you take a X3 720 BE unlock it and its stable you will get to overclock it about as high as a X4 925 since both are 2.8ghz stock and the 720 most likely is a 925 turned 720.

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 01/25/2010 06:15 PM
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Seryat
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Thanks for your explanations. Very helpful.
 03/03/2010 03:39 AM
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sam.reader
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Sorry to bump into this thread but it looks like the perfect place to put my questions.
Can we ever overclock using an original Intel Board by means of an external program?
Is it absolutely impossible to overclock a PC running on Intel Original Board from the BIOS?

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 03/03/2010 04:03 AM
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slaveondope
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Do you mean an OEM motherboard that came in say a Dell, Compaq, HP that sort of thing? If so its usually unlikely from my experiences due to lack of BIOS options and the general use of lower end motherboards by OEMs. This not to say it cant be done, just my own experience AMD only. Since most boards have similiar chipsets I think it could be possible.

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More Advanced Micro Devices than Intel
 03/19/2010 05:28 AM
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sam.reader
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Hello guys.Since no one has answered my questions I would like to post them again and get some news on it.
Can we ever overclock using an original Intel Board by means of an external program?
Is it absolutely impossible to overclock a PC running on Intel Original Board from the BIOS?
Some one please help me on this one.
Thanks in advance

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