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Topic Title: Building your own computer case
Topic Summary: Anybody here done that before?
Created On: 02/05/2010 10:51 AM
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 02/05/2010 10:51 AM
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MU_Engineer
Dr. Mu

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There are a lot of case modders here that do things like put windows in a case, cut out new fan holes, and give their cases paint jobs. But has anybody actually built their own case from scratch before? I am curious to see if anybody has as I am thinking about doing that for my next build that I'll get to do in about a year (I am absolutely itching to do it ) I have some, um, non-standard requirements that pretty much rule out commonly-available cases. I'd have to either make a case myself out of wood or get a local metal shop to fabricate me one. I could do either but I'm a fair woodworker and custom-fabbed metal cases aren't all that cheap, so I'm considering making it myself.

What do you guys think? Anybody have any suggestions?

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 02/05/2010 11:07 AM
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dimwit13
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heres mine

dimwits case



the insides have changed from what is shown in these pictures.


-dimwit-

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 02/05/2010 11:33 AM
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MU_Engineer
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Ooh, that looks nice. I guess I didn't read down the forum enough to see your case. I went and looked and saw what you did- good job. I'll make sure to ask you questions before I actually start on this project.

However, my case would be a bit different. You were able to use an existing case to provide the internal skeleton and to get the spacing of the internal parts correct. I probably won't be able to due to the large motherboard size. For example, you have a motherboard tray that is tapped for standoffs at the appropriate places and you have the correct spacing between the motherboard tray and the rear expansion card bracket, although you have removed the bracket in the picture in your thread. I won't have a suitable motherboard tray, so I'll have to make my own or get one made for me. I'll also have to find some way to secure the tray, for which I'm leaning towards keeping the motherboard horizontal to let gravity do most of the work in securing the motherboard tray.

Essentially I'm thinking about right now is making basically a taller, wider rackmount-type case. I'll have the drive bays off to the side of the motherboard instead of in front so the case isn't overly long. I'll get the 5.25" drive bays from either a case mod site (some sell those for DIY cases) or scrounge them from existing old cases. I'll put a hinged door on the top and on the drive bay side of the case, and the rest will be basically a fixed box. I'll have the motherboard sit on some fat rubber standoffs so the positioning of the standoffs isn't critical- I've tried tapping motherboard trays before to add more standoffs and I always wiggle and end up with the standoff a little out of line.

What do you think of that kind of a plan? Doable?

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 02/05/2010 12:29 PM
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Canis-X
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Sounds interesting!

You should put together a diagram of what you are thinking....something basic is fine....and post it up here.

In regards to your tapping new standoff's issue....if you already know/tried this please tell me to shut up....LOL......you should always mark the spot.....punch the metal to make a dimple (a hammer and a small phillips-head screw driver does just fine) then drill your hole....this is the best way to make sure your drill bit doesn't walk when you begin taping the hole.

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 02/05/2010 01:00 PM
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MU_Engineer
Dr. Mu

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Originally posted by: BuckShot3280

Sounds interesting!

You should put together a diagram of what you are thinking....something basic is fine....and post it up here.


I have some very rough sketches on paper as I have a few different potential case layouts. There are just so many ways you can have a layout when you're doing it all from scratch! I'll get some better sketches done up here sometime soon, but I'm on nights for the next week, so I may be a little late with doing that. I'll post them as soon as I get some made, though. I am just in the thinking phase, so I'm not going to do anything for a little while. I have to wait until I get closer to getting that first real paycheck, and also for Socket G34 parts to debut

In regards to your tapping new standoff's issue....if you already know/tried this please tell me to shut up....LOL......you should always mark the spot.....punch the metal to make a dimple (a hammer and a small phillips-head screw driver does just fine) then drill your hole....this is the best way to make sure your drill bit doesn't walk when you begin taping the hole.


I've done that, but I still end up about 1/16" off. I don't know if it's bit walk or just a small measurement error, but I've never gotten standoff holes to be perfect. I also just have a hand drill and a steel twist bit, so maybe if you have a drill press and a vise, you'd be able to get the hole drilled exactly where you want to. Motherboards are unforgiving as the holes are only big enough to allow maybe 1/32" of slop before you can't fit the screw through them any more.

But even if I were able to tap perfect holes in a motherboard tray and have a vertically-oriented motherboard, I don't think I'd want to. The only advantage of a vertical case is that it has a smaller footprint. I don't care if the case has a large footprint as I am not space-constrained. You are fighting gravity with a standard tower as any heavy parts pull perpendicular to the board. I always have to lay my existing cases flat on the ground to work in them, so a case that's already in that position with a nice big hinged lid would be great. Plus, heat rises and a big vented lid would allow for better heat dissipation than a tower case. I figure I could have a huge amount of airflow with 250 mm or bigger fans and do so very quietly.

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 02/06/2010 07:41 AM
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Sgt
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That cool ................

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 02/06/2010 09:34 PM
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PorscheRacer14
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Hey, MU!! I'm actually custom fabricating a case for my G34 vuild so I think we're both going to come across a lot of the same scenarios and problems/ideas, etc. Maybe we should brainstorm together.

I sort of have this grand idea to make a case to miminc the Monolith in 2010 with the required dimensions to suit. I figure with my measurements I can keep a horizontal motherboard (old school works better with heat rise) and be able to insulate it for sound and temperature and have it vent out the top. I dunno, just a crazy idea I had, but I would prefer a horizontal motherboard setup on a sliding tray for easy access, or else a wide door to poke my head in at least and work on if needed...or display proudly the "awsumsauce" inside, haha. I'm leaning towards 300mm fans but 250mm as minimal. Should be no real need for a bunch of small fans in this setup. I'm also thinking of water cooling, but only if it can be silent. I'm going for a near silent setup. Then again, water-cooling kinda freaks me out at times...

As soon as motherboards start appearing in final form I'll start hammering out some motherboard tray ideas.

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 02/06/2010 10:52 PM
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MU_Engineer
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Originally posted by: PorscheRacer14

Hey, MU!! I'm actually custom fabricating a case for my G34 vuild so I think we're both going to come across a lot of the same scenarios and problems/ideas, etc. Maybe we should brainstorm together.



I sort of have this grand idea to make a case to miminc the Monolith in 2010 with the required dimensions to suit. I figure with my measurements I can keep a horizontal motherboard (old school works better with heat rise) and be able to insulate it for sound and temperature and have it vent out the top. I dunno, just a crazy idea I had, but I would prefer a horizontal motherboard setup on a sliding tray for easy access, or else a wide door to poke my head in at least and work on if needed...or display proudly the "awsumsauce" inside, haha. I'm leaning towards 300mm fans but 250mm as minimal. Should be no real need for a bunch of small fans in this setup. I'm also thinking of water cooling, but only if it can be silent. I'm going for a near silent setup. Then again, water-cooling kinda freaks me out at times...



As soon as motherboards start appearing in final form I'll start hammering out some motherboard tray ideas.


Sounds great! That sounds pretty similar to what I'm doing. I'm working on some diagrams too, but it's going pretty slowly since I'm on nights and have been pretty busy. I'll share what I have when I get it done. All I have drafted right now is a very basic diagram of the floor of the case.

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 02/06/2010 11:29 PM
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PorscheRacer14
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Sounds good, and I will do the same.

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 02/08/2010 03:22 PM
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MU_Engineer
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I have made a rough mock-up of the case design from the top and the front.

">http://s65.photobucket.com/alb.../case_mockup_front.png

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 02/08/2010 03:27 PM
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MU_Engineer
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Sorry about the double post, but I messed up with the img src and I can't edit my previous message!





I have a few goals in mind in designing this case

1. I wanted to make the case easy to work in. There is going to be a hinged lid that covers the entire top that lifts up for easy access. It is missing in the picture, but it goes from the front plate that's hash-marked all the way to the back of the case. There will also be a hinged door on the left side that allows access to the side of the HDD cages for screw access.

2. I wanted plenty of room so I wouldn't run into clearance issues. My current desktop is absolutely plagued with them. I had to take the side panel fan mount off since it hit my CPU heatsink, so now I have a gaping open hole in the side of my case. My GPU also buts right up against the back of the HDD cages, making working in the bottom half of the case very tricky. My desktop is in an Antec Nine Hundred, which is far from a small case. This case doesn't have anything butting up against anything else. Only a front panel card reader and a fan controller are in the motherboard compartment, and they won't even overhang the motherboard because I left five inches of space between the case front and the motherboard tray. The only downside is that this case is going to be fairly large (~28" wide by ~16" tall by ~21 inches deep.)

3. I wanted plenty of large fans to move a lot of air quietly. I haven't stubbed in any fans yet, but there will certainly be a 120 mm fan in each of the HDD cages and some larger ones in the lid. I am thinking I'll put one of these guys in the lid and that'll be pretty good to cool the entire system. Either that or I'll put two 250s up there. The fan controller will be for CPU fans as I'll betcha that they'll be loud if I don't dial down the speed. I haven't run across a server setup yet that didn't have heatsinks with smaller fans (70-77 mm) and the motherboard always ran them at 100%. The lid fans ought to keep the case plenty cool so I won't need to run the heatsink fans at all that high of an RPM.

So there you go. This is still in the planning phase, but tell me what you guys think.

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Edited: 02/08/2010 at 03:59 PM by MU_Engineer
 02/08/2010 05:37 PM
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PorscheRacer14
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I like it, I like it! Well that means I'm going to have to finish up mine and make it presentable. But yeah, I understand all too much about the 900, and even then, it's a much larger case than the Sonata was when I first built this. I've had this thing stripped down and put back together about 3 times this past weekend after the paint job and the subsequent grounding issue. No more cramped places and spaces and there's going to be some clever wiring access too.

That part... I'm waiting on I guess to see where the PSU goes, and if I standard ATX PSU or that new one Antec has or if I need an actual server PSU for 2P connections on the mobo.

My challenges will be making an absolutely smooth finish and hidden lines along with a non-reflective finish. Or else I just make a purely effecient design that's not about esthetics and looks (too much) and make it work. I ws also thinking of adding in a 2.5" drive area but it looks like the faster and larger SSDs are now going on to 3.5" drives.

But yep, I do like it and the size pretty much is about what the footprint on mine is like. I do have a 30 degree canter (front to back) on my mainboard to aid in heat dissipation and airflow with the 300mm fans.

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 02/08/2010 06:16 PM
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MU_Engineer
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Originally posted by: PorscheRacer14

I like it, I like it! Well that means I'm going to have to finish up mine and make it presentable. But yeah, I understand all too much about the 900, and even then, it's a much larger case than the Sonata was when I first built this. I've had this thing stripped down and put back together about 3 times this past weekend after the paint job and the subsequent grounding issue. No more cramped places and spaces and there's going to be some clever wiring access too.


I saw that Antec Nine Hundred modification. It looks like it would fit in great on the set of the Austin Powers movie Goldmember or Mr. T's house

That part... I'm waiting on I guess to see where the PSU goes, and if I standard ATX PSU or that new one Antec has or if I need an actual server PSU for 2P connections on the mobo.


It depends on the motherboard. 2P motherboards will have the 24-pin main power connector and either a single 8-pin EPS12V connector, an 8-pin EPS12V plus a 4-pin ATX12V connector, or two 8-pin EPS12V connectors. Generally higher-end boards with more RAM slots tend to require more power pins and most current 2P boards appear to require a 4-pin plus an 8-pin or two 8-pin connectors.

Nearly all new decent-sized desktop PSUs will have an 8-pin EPS12V connector, which is commonly a 4+4 snap-together connector. Many higher-end desktop boards now have an 8-pin EPS12V connector instead of the older 4-pin ATX12V connector, which is why nearly all new PSUs have this connector. Many newer PSUs provide both a 4-pin ATX12V and an 8-pin EPS12V cable, probably so the user can choose the appropriate cable instead of messing with a snap-apart 4+4 main cable. However, you can use these PSUs with server boards that require both connectors. Desktop PSUs with two EPS12V connectors are uncommon, so you would need a server PSU with two EPS12V connectors to power such a board. Otherwise, you can get an 8-pin PCI Express to EPS12V adapter and use a desktop PSU. If you want a really ugly setup to try to power, TYAN's quad-socket units require two EPS12V connectors and a 4-pin ATX12V connector. Of course they also recommend a minimum of a 1000-watt PSU for those boards as well

My challenges will be making an absolutely smooth finish and hidden lines along with a non-reflective finish. Or else I just make a purely effecient design that's not about esthetics and looks (too much) and make it work. I ws also thinking of adding in a 2.5" drive area but it looks like the faster and larger SSDs are now going on to 3.5" drives.


That's what I am just making 5.25" bays. You can get 5.25" drive cages for both 2.5" and 3.5" HDDs, so I'd just get different cages later if I needed them. Non-hot-swap cages are about $30, so there's not too much of an investment there.

But yep, I do like it and the size pretty much is about what the footprint on mine is like. I do have a 30 degree canter (front to back) on my mainboard to aid in heat dissipation and airflow with the 300mm fans.


I was looking for 300 mm fans and all I could find are 250s and 360s. Two 300 mm fans would be perfect as they would take up the entire top of the lid and provide a ton of ventilation.

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 02/08/2010 07:36 PM
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PorscheRacer14
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yeah I did a look at NCIX.com and they no longer have the cooler master replacement fans I guess till I can find a source, two Antec 250mm Big Boys would work just as good. You can easily paint them to suit your needs. Some fans don't paint well, but I was pretty impressed with mine. No wobble or anything afterwards. You can always use the speed switches or else run them on max and then use a fan controller to vary their speed. I was looking at some nice Aerocool controllers, but who knows. Aerocool does have a 400mm fan, but again, it's only on the side panel. I wonder if it's possibe to just buy the panel with the fan and then scrap the panel and use the fan. If it was a reasonable price though.

My Antec 850 does have the extra 8-pin connector, but I'll have to see how the motherboards present their power conenctors. BTX is the form factor for the new 120mm tall/wide PSUs from Antec. They are taller but they are a bit shorter, so I'll see what connectors and power ratings they start coming out with. The first ones were only 650 watts and I might need more than that. I'd also like something 80+ silver or gold certified.

I'd like to try to make an effecient (yet poweferful) setup in regards to power and thermal output. The gold certified ones I've seen in reviews work actually very well even on low power draw. Too bad we don't have 240v over here as that's when those PSUs really shine, or I guess any PSU really.

I'm going to take a look around at Princess Auto (surplus store). Sometimes they have oddball fans kicking around there. I found some Panaflos there for super cheap with rubber mounts.

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 02/08/2010 09:27 PM
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MU_Engineer
Dr. Mu

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Originally posted by: PorscheRacer14

yeah I did a look at NCIX.com and they no longer have the cooler master replacement fans I guess till I can find a source, two Antec 250mm Big Boys would work just as good.


Yeah, they would. The 250 mm fans I've seen turn at about 800 rpm and move about 100 cfm of air. Two of them would be plenty, but the 300 mm fans turning at about 600 rpm move about the same amount of air and should be even quieter, plus fill out the lid a little better. I'd need about three inches more of width to fit two 360 mm fans comfortably side by side in the lid.

You can easily paint them to suit your needs.


As long as they're some normal color like clear, black, or some shade of gray, they'll be fine as they will be sitting behind a mesh panel.

Some fans don't paint well, but I was pretty impressed with mine. No wobble or anything afterwards. You can always use the speed switches or else run them on max and then use a fan controller to vary their speed. I was looking at some nice Aerocool controllers, but who knows. Aerocool does have a 400mm fan, but again, it's only on the side panel. I wonder if it's possibe to just buy the panel with the fan and then scrap the panel and use the fan. If it was a reasonable price though.


The fan looks like it is part of the side of the case and may be difficult to remove. But it's probably nothing a standard screwdriver, a pair of pliers, and a set of tin snips can't solve

My Antec 850 does have the extra 8-pin connector, but I'll have to see how the motherboards present their power conenctors.


I mis-spoke. What I said was true about a year ago (the last time I needed to get a new PSU), but today most 850+ watt PSUs have two 8-pin connectors, either as two 8s, an 8 plus a 4+4, or two 4+4s. Sorry about the misinformation.

The particular orientation of the +12 V connectors varies by the board. 2P boards will have at least one EPS12V connector and may have an additional ATX12V or EPS12V connector. A PSU with two 8-pin connectors would be fine as you can plug an 8-pin connector into a 4-pin socket and it will work just fine- the unused pins just hang over the edge of the socket.

BTX is the form factor for the new 120mm tall/wide PSUs from Antec. They are taller but they are a bit shorter, so I'll see what connectors and power ratings they start coming out with. The first ones were only 650 watts and I might need more than that. I'd also like something 80+ silver or gold certified.


Antec calls it CPX and they've come up with bigger units. I saw a 1000 W CPX unit on JonnyGuru. The CPX cutout is taller but the same 5.875" width as an ATX/EPS PSU, so it would be easy to make a case that would take either kind of PSU. You'd just have a bit of empty space between the top of an ATX/EPS PSU and the top of the cutout if you sized the opening for CPX and you installed an ATX/EPS PSU.

I'd like to try to make an effecient (yet poweferful) setup in regards to power and thermal output. The gold certified ones I've seen in reviews work actually very well even on low power draw.


I suppose you have to define efficiency in some metric like computing horsepower per joule or something of that nature, else you'll be very disappointed. A dual Socket G34 unit will draw more power than most dual C32 setups or just about any single-socket setup. I know my planned setup (quad G34s, a few HDDs, with one decent GPU) isn't going to be the paragon of energy conservation as it will likely consume somewhere around 600 watts under maximum load. Granted, it won't be running at that load all the time, but I bet it will take something like 150 watts at idle. Yours will probably clock in at 400 or so full load and in the low 100s at idle, definitely more if you run an overclocked, high-end GPU like your HD 2900. But if you compare that to the guys with CrossFired GPUs and a healthy Phenom II overclock, the power consumption is about the same, yet the Magny-Courses will absolutely embarrass those units in multi-threaded application performance.

Too bad we don't have 240v over here as that's when those PSUs really shine, or I guess any PSU really.


We certainly do have 240 V here in U.S. Your central air conditioner uses it, as does your water heater, stove, furnace, and clothes dryer if you don't have gas. Most homes don't have 240-volt receptacles for plugging in smaller loads like computer PSUs, but there is absolutely no reason why you couldn't run a 240-volt branch circuit and put a receptacle at the end. Quite a few people who do things like woodworking do just that for some of their shop tools. I actually know a guy on another forum who actually ran a 240-volt circuit to his computer, which if I remember correctly, was an 8-socket Opteron setup and probably needed such an arrangement

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 02/08/2010 10:33 PM
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PorscheRacer14
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Yeah, I do have a 240 line in the basement than can be reworked into the office, but we kind of went past that point. It can be done, but if I went that way, then I'd build a true server room in the back since it's right beside the grid and backup power system. That's a little more advantageous than what I had initially thought of though, haha.

I do understand it will use a fair amount of power, but I'd like to try to think green about it, and keep things near silent. There was a time I did put up with loud things (R600) and such, but after getting my 4770 I'm really getting used to whisper quiet computing. I also intend to do some folding on it so that's where the green thumb kicks in a bit. Make no mistake though, perormance is the main scope, with effeciency a close second.

I still will use it for gaming, so some considerations are put aside for that. Hopefully Crossfire Pro makes it into the chipsets, if not an X2 card will work.

The rough outside case dimensions are 20" (L) x 40" (W) x 60" (H) as per the Monolith at 1:2:3 dimensions. This should give me plenty of room, though the entire case will not be full of stuff. Basically the mid portion only with drives and controllers in one sealed compartment and motherboard, etc. in another sealed compartment. Basically it will function like a Cray standup server in use for access with the hard drives and such being on a slide out rail and motherboard access through a wide opening door. The rest of the upper area is for heat trapping and removal, cooling gizmos and such. If I can't find aluminum and steel at a good price (asking my buddy who works at IPSCO) then it'll be just the shorter version done with MDFB and cherry oak veneer.

I just want something easy to work on, without cut fingers, weird wiring stuff and heatsinks that barely fit. Basically I big desktop PC with a built in stand, haha. Towers are nice for the small area, but everything is on it's side and crammed in there, even on the Antec 900 which is a pretty large case. My pal got the 1200 and it was still a bit cramped for my liking. Oh and solid-state power and reset buttons that make the click sound like abck in the old days.

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 05/05/2010 06:14 PM
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MU_Engineer
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Well, I did a few months worth of thinking and saw that all of the handmade cases either used an existing case as a skeleton or somebody made a metal case from scratch. Making it all out of wood from scratch like I thought would be overly difficult, and finding an existing case that can fit a 16x13 board would pretty much defeat the purpose of building a case. So, I looked far and wide and after a LOT of searching found four tower-type cases that can comfortably hold a 4P board and a bunch o' disks:

1. Addtronics CL9240


Unfortunately it has been out of production for many years and I cannot find anybody who has it.

2. Akiwa GHS-2000


It is still in production and a vendor has them in stock for $450 each (plus a shipping weight of about 110 pounds).

3. Amtrade 2300L-ATX


Still in production, costs $638 plus shipping on 70 lbs ship weight.

4. Chenming ATX-801F


If you have a sharp eye, this case was rebranded by Antec, Enermax, Chieftec, and perhaps others around the year 2000. I could not find any of those cases new or used anywhere, but I found one retailer who was selling the Chenbro version for $289 + $50 shipping.

Needless to say, I put in an order for the Chenming unit. All 68 pounds of it should show up on my doorstep in about a week or so. The sales guy I talked to when I ordered the case warned me to not hurt myself when I picked it up as it is enormous and heavy

I don't know exactly when I'll start the rest of the build, but I didn't want to miss getting a rare case at a good price and a case can sit quietly in the closet for a while. I'll need to get some HDD cages for it (I'm thinking Cooler Master non-hotswap three-bay, four-drive units, each costs about $25) and then I'll be ready to roll. On a side note, it does roll as it has wheels

I'll post pictures when I get it so you can see just how enormous this guy is

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 05/05/2010 08:29 PM
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PorscheRacer14
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That is massive!!! You must have one large closet, haha. I'm just going to stamp and weld a skeleton/frame and then attach all the MDFB/panelling to it. I was going to go 1/2" but then I recall my speaker cabinets I made and they are bloody heavy to lug around. Maybe 3/8" or 1/4" and then just add sound deadening material to it. I added that to the basement cealing in my house during the renovations and you can barely hear the miter saw below so that's sort of what I'm leaning to, plus it's fireproof. I don't know if it's good or bad for heat retention so I'll have to experiment when the time comes.

I'm still waiting for some of the boards to crop up and show up here to get an idea of prices. The CPUs are fine to grab, but motherboards are very hard to come by. One of the SuperMicro boards and an Asus board piqued my interest. Hopefully when bulldozer gets near there might be a minor refresh or at least more availability.

I love that chassis though. And on casters! Of course we'll take plenty of pictures!

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 05/05/2010 09:20 PM
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Joined: 08/26/2006

Yeah, it's big, but it's appropriately big to fit the large board and the RAID I am going to stick in there. I'm thinking either four HDDs in RAID5 or 6-8 in RAID50 plus two SSDs in RAID0 for the OS, plus a fan controller and a card reader. That takes quite a few 5.25" bays and this case has plenty. I am tired of fighting with tight, cramped cases and something of this size is just about right.

The really bad thing is that large, roomy cases like the one I ordered used to be very common about a decade ago but now they're rare. You can tell that mine is actually a decade-old design because it's beige and beige cases fell out of style when metal and grunge music did. (Yes, I am an unabashed fan of those dead genres of music and am also not ashamed to have a beige case. I thumb my nose at the idiots who buy silver and white computers and listen to "emo.") Servers of any size are rackmounted today, so the only pedestal server chassis out there are for small 2P and 1P systems. The exceptions are extremely expensive 4P proprietary chassis from TYAN and Supermicro that aren't even all that roomy. You can still get some full-tower EATX-capable desktop cases, but they're still typically smaller than the full-tower cases of a decade ago. I got an early 2000s-vintage AOpen full-tower case from a local computer shop that was using it as a plant stand and it is considerably larger than most cases today that pass for full-tower. I would think that today's obsession with multiple GPUs and humongous CPU heatsinks would lend itself to large cases, but apparently the trend today is to stuff as many parts as tightly as possible into a small case.

G34 motherboards are pretty widely available at sources that sell to actual professionals and not primarily gamers. Look at Provantage, ASA Servers (Supermicro boards only), Acme Micro Systems (acmemicro.com), AVA Direct, and Erie Computer Company (CostCentral.com). Provantage and Acme Micro probably have the largest selection of everything Magny-Cours related, but ASA Servers has the best price on Supermicro boards by a decent margin.

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 05/05/2010 09:24 PM
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QB the Slayer
Case Modder

Posts: 1304
Joined: 01/23/2010

Why not just get a HAF 932... I have a 4 disk RAID, an SSD, a ROM and a LCD for my ChillTEC... and I still have 4 drive bays left for space if I need it. Plus it is very roomy and very cool

QB

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The MONSTER HTPC

CPU: AMD Phenom II X4 965 C2 (140W).||.Cooler: Corsair H80i
MB: Gigabyte 990FXA-UD7.||.RAM: 8 GB Mushkin Blackline DDR3 2000MHz (7-10-8-27-1T)
Case: CoolerMaster HAF 932.||.PSU: Corsair HX750
GPU:HIS IceQ 5 Radeon HD 5770 Turbo 1GB.||.Audio: Creative X-Fi Titanium Fatal1ty Pro w/ Logitech Z-5300e (5.1, 280W-RMS)
Drive: 2xKingston SSD 40GB RAID0.||.Storage: 6TB (4x500GB Caviar Black RAID0, 2TB Hitachi & 2TB Caviar Green)
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