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Topic Title: Yet another cooling solution question...
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Created On: 09/09/2006 04:03 PM
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 09/09/2006 04:03 PM
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lawless314
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Joined: 09/09/2006

I'm about ready to make a purchase of a 4600+ AM2 system and it will be my first build in a long time (my current system lasted quite a while!

While I will not be overclocking, I will be running a very intensive system (3D rendering and the like) and I am very concerned about heat (as I live in a hot climate and I'm in a room with poor circulation). My current system has been overheating a lot, which is why I'm upgrading, and while I could probably just apply a new pad - I'm using it as an excuse, so hush! =D

I don't want to make the jump to water cooling, though, so I'm going to try to make the best of air cooling with a large, Thermaltake case and a lot of fans.

However, I am concerned about using the stock heatsink and thermal paste. Do they generally hold up under resource intensive applications, or should I go with a third party HS and thermal paste? I'm think Zalman 9500 or the Freezer 64 Pro with, of course, a AS5 application - or do third party heatsinks already come with good thermal paste applied?

Thank you very much.
 09/09/2006 04:47 PM
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CBI Elite
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By the sounds of it, you'd be better-off with a 3rd party HSF. The stock one is great, but if your room is like mine, where there is little air movement and warm, then a nice copper HSF would do you some good. Don't get into water as with your room temperature, it may not be as effective as one would think.

Just remember, when using another HSF, it voids your warranty with AMD, so think it through. Those are some nice heatsinks you mentioned there, and definately stick with AS5. Just be sure to apply it right!

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AMD Athlon 64 3200+ E3 @ 2.6GHz/1.44V | Asus A8N-SLi V1014
eVGA 7900 GS @ 525MHz/1,450MHz | <a href="http://ww
 09/09/2006 05:26 PM
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mstcrow5429
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I've have to disagree, I think the stock heatsinks that come with a PIB are more than enough for normal clocked CPUs. As for AS5, I'm wary of that, it's electrically conductive, can short things out, and I've read posts saying AMD says don't use AS5. (edit: I made an error. It seems AMD did not recommend the original AS, as it was conductive, for the Athlons. AS5 is non-conductive, although it is capacitive, so that should work without problems as long as it stays on the heat spreader.)
 09/09/2006 05:31 PM
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elite_athlon
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On AMD 64's there is Zero risk of shorting since it has the big ole heat speader. Although if you get some on the pins all [content edited] could break lose.

If you don't like AS5 get MX-1.

And sometimes the stock cooler isn't even good enough for stock, i know some one who had a A64 3000+, and the stock cooler wouldn't cut it (btw he lived in a warmer climate though)

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 09/10/2006 11:32 AM
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bvchurch
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quote:

Originally posted by: mstcrow5429
I've have to disagree, I think the stock heatsinks that come with a PIB are more than enough for normal clocked CPUs. As for AS5, I'm wary of that, it's electrically conductive, can short things out, and I've read posts saying AMD says don't use AS5.


As long as you use the AS5 correctly it is perfectly fine with AMD, as a note though, make sure your processor has a heatspreader.
quote:

Originally posted by: Unknown >Hello (Name),
>Thank you for contacting AMD's Technical Service Center.
>
>Yes, the retail box package contains the Shin Etsu. The Arctic Silver
>should be ok, as long as is used correctly, incorrect use of this or
>any other thermal material could void your warranty. Please pay extra
>attention to the following statement, taken directly from the
>manufacturer of Arctic Silver 5.
>
>Arctic Silver 5 was formulated to conduct heat, not electricity.
>(While much safer than electrically conductive silver and copper
>greases, Arctic Silver 5 should be kept away from electrical traces,
>pins, and leads. While it is not electrically conductive, the compound
>is very slightly capacitive and could potentially cause problems if it
>bridges two close-proximity electrical paths.)
>
>Hope this helps. If you have any other questions, please feel free to
>contact me.
>
>Regards,
>Kristine
>Customer Support Analyst
>AMD TSC



@lawless, I would just wait it out and see how well the stock cooler works. I have had no problems with my setup and several times during the summer my internal room temperature was at or around 90*F. It is possible that you will get one of the "better" copper heatpipe heatsinks that has been praised all around the net and this forum.
 09/10/2006 03:47 PM
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Xtreeme
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I got a open box asus x-mars. Its pretty good for $20. Copper with 2 heatpipes and a 70mm fan with 80m blades (tapered delta fan).

Having said that though the stock HS fan is within a few C of the copper ones so no huge temp drops just modest ones.
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