Topic Title: R9 290x Crash at 95c
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Created On: 01/16/2014 05:03 PM
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 01/16/2014 05:03 PM
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maniac8291
Peon

Posts: 3
Joined: 01/16/2014

Just built a new system stress tested everything but the video card and it ran perfectly fine no over heats or errors. Now when the video card comes under load even if its a small load it warms up to 95c 94c around there and stays there. (Which I hear is normal opperating temp) However once it reaches this for about 1-2 minutes the system just crashes no blue screen it just restarts and you can hear the fans kick on really high and restart. Below are specs of my system

 

Motherboard - ASUS A88x-pro FM2+/FM2
 http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813132056

CPU - AMD 760K Richland 3.8 GHZ Socket FM2 100 W Quad Core
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16819113348

Ram G. Skill Ripjaws X Series 16GB 2x 8GB 240 Pin DDR3 2133
 http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820231571

2x Powercolor R9 290x 4GB
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814131522

 1,000 Watt Powersupply
 http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817190033

then the basics hard drive, blue ray player and cooler master HAFX High Air Flow Full Tower

Any ideas what might be causing the system to restart when the GPUs get to 95c? This also happens with single card as I tried both and with just one running same thing happens at 95c

Thanks! 

 01/16/2014 08:42 PM
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Thanny
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Joined: 07/13/2009

Given the description, it could easily be the power supply.  Your unit has six separate 12V rails, and I have no difficulty imagining a couple of them being overloaded, given how they're arranged (two at 20A, four at 30A).

Or, the PSU could simply be overheaded, perhaps because the cards at high temperature put too much heat into the case for your ventilation to handle.

More details on your exact case layout (including fans) might help.

 

 01/16/2014 11:42 PM
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maniac8291
Peon

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Joined: 01/16/2014

Thank you for getting back to me. I am sending back this power supply because when I was running CPUID Hardward monitor its showing my voltages going crazy when I reach that high point on the video cards. My guess is its to low of watage or just to few rails. Thus I am going with a larger 1200watt http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817153145 This one also has a 80plus gold rating instead of bronze on the other. Im not sure what that means really but I would guess better control on the wattages being output.

The only thing confusing me is I ran it with one card and it restarted as well as soon as it hit 95c. If this new power supply does not fix the issues then perhaps I am missing a safety net on the bios setting which is telling the system to shut down then the cards reach that temp.

When I ran the hardware monitor the hottest any other part of the system got was 80c it was only the video cards that got to 94c 95c but stay stable there (as I said before checked all around and 95c is just the standard operating temp of these cards) 

 01/16/2014 11:59 PM
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maniac8291
Peon

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Just for a little more info the case I have is http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16811119225

It has one side fan and one front fan to blow air into the system the Power supply also sucks in air from the bottom back and blows it up towards the cards. 1 fan in the back towards the top blows air out and 2 large fans at the top of the case blow hot air out as well. case also has many small holes in it to allow more air flow. I run a 5970 in the same case and it only reaches 80c on the card and the system itself just about 63c.

I looked into getting water cooling for the GPUs but it looks like you have to dismantel the card to attach them. Thus I dont want to do that because it will void the warranty on them

 01/18/2014 03:36 AM
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Thanny
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Posts: 1395
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If it's a matter of a specific rail being overloaded and going out of voltage spec, it could happen with one card as well as two, simply because it's the one card doing it.

If you've got sufficient ventilation, then the temperature is likely only sufficient in that you will be at max power consumption at that point, with the fan spinning as fast as it's allowed to maintain that temperature.

The PSU you're getting as a replacement is a big improvement, distribution-wise, but still has two rails.  Given the size of the second rail, however, it's almost certain to be the one with PCIe connectors on it, so you should be fine.  In the future, though, stick with single rails.

As for the temperature in general, the 290X cards are designed to let the card reach the defined maximum temperature (which defaults to 95C), then use only as much fan as necessary to maintain it.  Then, if the fan is at the max allowable speed (40% by default) but temperature still wants to go up, it will reduce clock speeds.  So an air-cooled 290X will pretty much always be at 95C when in a game.

If you live in the US, you will not void your warranty by replacing the heat sink with a water block.  If the card fails under warranty, the manufacturer must prove that the replacement cooling solution caused the problem to deny the warranty.  Not that they won't try to ignore that little 1975 law, if you let them.

Water cooling two 290X's would surely provide better results across the board.  Better performance due to never having to downclock to maintain temperature.  Less noise due to replacing individual component fans with larger and quieter radiator fans.  But it certainly wouldn't be cheap.  You're not going to find a cheap all-in-one solution like you do for processors.  You'd have to build your own custom loop, which takes time (most of it with research, so you know what you're doing), and plenty of additional money.  You can easily spend 2x290X money all over again, and single 290X money at a minimum.

But if you do it right, and can afford the expense, it's worth it.

 

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