Topic Title: Athlon II X4 640 safe temps?
Topic Summary: Measuring the temps from an Athlon II X4 640 with stock cooler.
Created On: 03/04/2014 10:55 PM
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 03/04/2014 10:55 PM
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So after doing some reading, I find that most people are trusting "Core Temp" More than CPUID's Hardware Monitor for some reason.

 

Anyway, after reading some more I came up with the magic number of "71C" being bad, yet coretemp has "TJ Max" at 99C...

 

Hardware monitor reads the CPU at 66C , while CoreTemp reads at 61C which is basically HardWare monitor's "Core temps" vs "CPU temp" in the program itself.

 

So, should I be worried ?  Should I run out and by a big bad Hyper 212 fast as I can ? Or are these acceptable during games ?

 03/05/2014 12:07 AM
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It can get confusing...

AMD states that 71C is the max 24/7 core temp. Some software misreads temps. Core Temp does a pretty good job and is what I recommend. Core Temp however does not always have the correct TjMax temps which is where the CPU/APU starts to throttle itself to keep from burning up if you have some HSF cooling issue.

http://products.amd.com/(S(1dly5155dgtchw20bflg0q55))/pages/desktopcpudetail.aspx?id=654

So in your case you want to stay below 71C core temp under maximum load. FYI - core temp and CPU temp are not the same. CPU temp is typically the thermister mounted below the CPU socket and often reads 10C-25C higher than the internal core temp depending on CPU load and duration. It has no significance so you can ignore it. The max core temp is all that matters.



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 03/05/2014 12:14 AM
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Originally posted by: AMDforMe It can get confusing...

 

AMD states that 71C is the max 24/7 core temp. Some software misreads temps. Core Temp does a pretty good job and is what I recommend. Core Temp however does not always have the correct TjMax temps which is where the CPU/APU starts to throttle itself to keep from burning up if you have some HSF cooling issue.

 

http://products.amd.com/(S(1dly5155dgtchw20bflg0q55))/pages/desktopcpudetail.aspx?id=654

 

So in your case you want to stay below 71C core temp under maximum load. FYI - core temp and CPU temp are not the same. CPU temp is typically the thermister mounted below the CPU socket and often reads 10C-25C higher than the internal core temp depending on CPU load and duration. It has no significance so you can ignore it. The max core temp is all that matters.

 

 

So, with Core Temp not reading more then 61C in games there is no real NEED to run out and grab a non-stock cooler or worry?

 

Edit: Running Prime95 for 4 mins got me up to 69C before I stopped the workers.

 03/05/2014 09:50 AM
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If when running under full load your core temp is 71C or lower you are fine. If your CPU runs higher than that then you'll want a larger/better HSF. The OE HSF usually works fine unless you have very high ambient temps or poor PC case airflow.

P95 is a stress test that produces maximum CPU temp. If your normal PC use can't duplicate this much load then you have no issues at 61C. If however your use drives the core temp higher than 71C then I'd suggest a better HSF.



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 03/05/2014 06:03 PM
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Originally posted by: AMDforMe or poor PC case airflow.

 

 

I think you are hitting the nail on the head.  I bought a cheap case with just a rear fan, and the 6750 is by the WD Black I had.  The WD Black was getting up in to the 50C's and I was told that's too hot for hard drives, so I put a side fan on (above the CPU) and now I'm noticing the CPU fan being slower when the temps are high (as apposed to before the side fan install) with the 2500 RPM fan atop of it blowing out as well as the fan in the back blowing out.

 

I couldn't stand the noise of the fan blowing inwards as intake.

 03/05/2014 10:34 PM
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Good PC case airflow is important. You can stall the airflow with too little or too much airflow which can cause turbulence and the recirculation of the hot air instead of exhausting it.



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 03/05/2014 10:37 PM
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Originally posted by: AMDforMe Good PC case airflow is important. You can stall the airflow with too little or too much airflow which can cause turbulence and the recirculation of the hot air instead of exhausting it.

 

 

Perhaps I should get a case that has the "push pull" setup ? Fan in front pushing in, fan out the back pushing out ?

 03/05/2014 11:32 PM
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If your CPU isn't running above 71C there really isn't any need. The PC cases that use a front and rear fan are very typical and do a good job of moving air thru the case. It just depends on what you desire and your budget.



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 03/06/2014 12:09 AM
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Originally posted by: AMDforMe If your CPU isn't running above 71C there really isn't any need. The PC cases that use a front and rear fan are very typical and do a good job of moving air thru the case. It just depends on what you desire and your budget.

 

 

I really can't purchase anything right now.  I'm wondering if I could maybe cut the mesh a little bit, and flip it around to become an intake and come out better ?  The side fan that's just above the CPU.

 03/06/2014 09:53 AM
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It's best to have smooth airflow through the case typically with cool air going in the front of the case and hot air out the back. Side fans can sometimes improve cooling or hurt cooling if they disrupt the flow of hot air out of the case. Mounting a fan in the front of the case instead of the side often works better but each situation is unique and all you can do is try things and monitor the temp.



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 03/06/2014 02:22 PM
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Originally posted by: AMDforMe It's best to have smooth airflow through the case typically with cool air going in the front of the case and hot air out the back. Side fans can sometimes improve cooling or hurt cooling if they disrupt the flow of hot air out of the case. Mounting a fan in the front of the case instead of the side often works better but each situation is unique and all you can do is try things and monitor the temp.

 

 

The case I have doesn't have anything for a front fan.

 

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16811233064

 03/06/2014 03:46 PM
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Lots of times the PC case has the mounting holes for an 80mm or 120mm front case fan but it's not included to keep the price lower. You might take a peek at your case to see if there are fan mounting holes in the front section and if so for what size fan. Fans are pretty cheap so it might be a cost effective means to lowered the temps?



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Technical ignorance is NOT a destiny it is a choice. Do your homework so that you can make technically informed decisions and not be duped by advertising hype or mis-information stated as fact when its not.


 

 03/06/2014 07:56 PM
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Originally posted by: AMDforMe Lots of times the PC case has the mounting holes for an 80mm or 120mm front case fan but it's not included to keep the price lower. You might take a peek at your case to see if there are fan mounting holes in the front section and if so for what size fan. Fans are pretty cheap so it might be a cost effective means to lowered the temps?

 

 

Seeing http://images10.newegg.com/NeweggImage/productimage/11-233-064-07.jpg , I only see a mount on the side too  ?

 03/06/2014 09:18 PM
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Unfortunately it doesn't look like there is a front mount from the picture but you should be able to open it easily and take a closer look. The rear fan mount area looks like it can mount either the OE 80mm or a larger 120mm fan which would move a lot more air than the 80mm fan. That might help some.



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 03/06/2014 09:23 PM
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I wonder if I took the 80mm sidefan off, the 80mm backfan off and replaced it with a 120mm backfan not controlled by the motherboard I could get better cooling than 2x80mm outtakes ?

 

Or should I leave the 120mm controlled by BIOS ?

 03/06/2014 11:16 PM
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I never control the case fans via the mobo/BIOS. I always run them at full speed as they are generally quiet fans compared to some of the high-speed CPU/GPU fans.

Unfortunately the only way to determine how the changes will work is to test them as there are a lot of variables with flow vs. turbulence.



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Technical ignorance is NOT a destiny it is a choice. Do your homework so that you can make technically informed decisions and not be duped by advertising hype or mis-information stated as fact when its not.


 

 03/07/2014 12:51 AM
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Originally posted by: AMDforMe I never control the case fans via the mobo/BIOS. I always run them at full speed as they are generally quiet fans compared to some of the high-speed CPU/GPU fans.

 

Unfortunately the only way to determine how the changes will work is to test them as there are a lot of variables with flow vs. turbulence.

 

 

Perhaps instead of $8 here, 10 there, 10 here.. for fans and trial and error.. I should just prepair to drop $50 on a case with more airflow? http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16811147153

 03/07/2014 10:51 AM
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It's difficult to tell what the PC case airflow will be without actually testing. As I indicated before side fans can create turbulence and cause higher CPU or other component temps.

The PC case you listed has a number of fans and options so it likely would help your situation but you will still need to test to see what works bets for your hardware. I would pass on the side fans unless they are proven to help.



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Technical ignorance is NOT a destiny it is a choice. Do your homework so that you can make technically informed decisions and not be duped by advertising hype or mis-information stated as fact when its not.


 

 03/07/2014 02:55 PM
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Originally posted by: AMDforMe It's difficult to tell what the PC case airflow will be without actually testing. As I indicated before side fans can create turbulence and cause higher CPU or other component temps.

 

The PC case you listed has a number of fans and options so it likely would help your situation but you will still need to test to see what works bets for your hardware. I would pass on the side fans unless they are proven to help.

 

 

Well the side fan has kept the WD Black hard drive from getting in to the 50's and SMART temp errors, but it made the CPU fan work slower and cause the CPU to heat up more.  So kind of a messed up if I do, messed up if I don't situation .

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