Topic Title: Opteron 6376 - Number of Cores
Topic Summary: Windows says 16 but powershell says 8 cores
Created On: 03/19/2014 04:14 PM
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 03/19/2014 04:14 PM
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pdusome
Peon

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Joined: 03/19/2014

I bought the 6376 (in an HP DL 385p) specifically because I wanted a large number of cores. Recently, I ran into a problem with an application where the number of cores for the 2 CPUs was reported as 16.  This limited the number of tasks in the app.  While Windows 2012 reports 16 cores per CPU, powershell reports only 8.  Logical processors was reported as 16.  The queries I used were:

- Get-WmiObject -class win32_processor -Property  numberofcores
- Get-WmiObject -class win32_processor -Property  NumberOfLogicalProcessors

What up with that?

 03/19/2014 04:33 PM
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black_zion
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Joined: 04/17/2008

That processor has 8 processing modules comprised of two integer and one floating point core.

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 03/19/2014 04:47 PM
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pdusome
Peon

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In other words, I wasted good money on false advertising?  If applications only see 8 core processors, they are only 16 core CPUs in AMD's world.

 03/19/2014 05:07 PM
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AMDforMe
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No you bought a CPU with 16 cores. 8 modules times 2 cores per module = 16 cores.

The nonsense about cores vs. floating point units has been debated to death but the reality is you genuinely have 2 cores per module that process multiple threads concurrently.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16819113306

For the record Intel's CPUs have virtual cores, i.e. 4 real cores and 4 virtual as in Non-physical cores. They act as 8 cores but they truly are only 4 physical cores.

How well software is written determines how well it uses all available cores. There is well written software that will use all cores and poorly written software that might effectively only use (4) cores of an 8 or 16 core CPU. The CPU isn't the problem at all. Piss poor code is the problem when the software doesn't use all of the available cores.



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Building a reliable PC involves more than just assembling the parts. You need to be able to configure all of the BIOS settings appropriately. This can be quite involved and frustrating as it can require a lot of trial and error with stress testing. It is however often the only means to get a 100% reliable PC.

 03/19/2014 08:52 PM
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pdusome
Peon

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Impressive technology. Unfortunately Operating Systems and most applications are years behind. I guess Veeam Backup 7.0 is piss poor code. I have a server running at 2% CPU utilization with Backups taking half a day because Veeam is waiting for resources on the server.

 03/19/2014 09:57 PM
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AMDforMe
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You are absolutely correct. Most so called 64-bit software is just cobbled 32-bit software that shows almost no performance advantage as it's so poorly ported. Windoze 64-bit O/Ss are a joke as far as performance is concerned. AMD CPUs often run programs much faster on Linux.

As far as the floating point unit (FPU), it is essentially a math co-processor. If the code doesn't have a need for FP math then it justs sits idle. If the code is poorly written it might not even use the hardware based FPU, it might use a FPU library. It's actually a disgrace that most consumer level software and O/Ss are so deficient, IMO.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Floating-point_unit



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Building a reliable PC involves more than just assembling the parts. You need to be able to configure all of the BIOS settings appropriately. This can be quite involved and frustrating as it can require a lot of trial and error with stress testing. It is however often the only means to get a 100% reliable PC.

 03/20/2014 10:05 AM
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zipsi
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Well slow backup times can't really be blamed on the cpu, hard drives are still the biggest bottleneck in modern systems. The cpu stands idle while the hard drives slowly push data through.



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