Topic Title: Processor upgrade :confused;
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Created On: 06/24/2013 10:28 PM
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 06/24/2013 10:28 PM
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Deathclaw409
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Will an AMD FX-8350 Cpu fit in an AMD E-300 APU with HD Radeon graphics socket???

 06/25/2013 07:41 AM
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Thanny
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No.

 08/21/2013 10:31 PM
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Ruckerduck
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Thanny:  Perhaps you would know about this -When I originally bought the ASROCK 990FX Extreme4 motherboard last year from Newegg I also bought memory I thought was compatible ... I installed everything with an AMD 965 processor with Cooler Master Hyper 212 cooler and everything worked well.  When I changed the processor 2 weeks ago to an AMD 8350, the computer worked well for 1 week.  There has never been a temperature problem - the temp is usually about 38-40C, and  max temperature I have observed when playing BIOSHOCK 1 was about 51C.   I had BIOSHOCK 1 on the computer last Sunday and walked away from the computer for 2 hours,  When I returned the computer had restarted and the display was showing BSOD.  When I restarted the computer it would start up correctly for about 2 minutes and the display would show the opening screen of Windows7, then BSOD.  I tried this several times with the same result.  I removed the AMD 8350 and reinstalled the AMD 965 processor, and now it works.   Is this a problem with the memory, the 8350 CPU, or the 990 Motherboard?  When I use CPUZ to find out what kind of memory I have without tearing the computer apart, it tells me I have 4 pieces of KHX1600C9D3/4GX which does not appear on the ASROCK list of approved memory :  when I go to the purchase records to find out what kind of memory I have, it gives KHX1600C9D3K2/8GX, 2 each which is 4 sticks of 4GB RAM on the ASROCK mem approval list.  Does this describe a bad CPU with the 8350?
 08/25/2013 01:15 AM
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MisterEd
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You might try reinstalling Windows and see if that elimimnates the BSODs.

I upgraded my CPU from Phenom II 960T to a FX-8350. The motherboard is a Gigabyte GA-990FX-UD3. I was running Windows 7 Ulitmate 32-bit and had a lot of BSODs. The main problem was with Windows Media Center and Windows DRM. Windows DRM does not like hardware changes. I was able to eliminate most but not all of the BSODs.

I was planning to reinstall in a few months but had to forget that and reinstall ASAP. I bought new RAM going from (2GBx2) to (4GBx2) so I could reinstall with Windows 7 64-bit instead of the previous Windows 7 32-bit. I no longer had any BSODs after that.

The so called list of approved RAMis really just a list of RAM that has been tested successfully with the motherboard. Most good DDR3 RAM with specs close to those on the approved list will probably work. You have to be carefull if you choose four sticks instead of two. The specs for the board will indicate the limitations in that case.



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Gigabyte GA-990FXA-UD3 | AMD FX-8350 | Corsair H60 Cooler | GSkill RipjawsX (2x4GB) | ASUS GeForce GTX 560 | WD Caviar Blue 1TB | Seagate 750GB | ASUS 24X DVD/RW| Windows 7 Ultimate 64-bit
ASUS M4N82 Deluxe | AMD Phenom II X4 960T | Corsair XMS2(2x2GB) | PNY GeForce GTS 250 (1GB) | Seagate 300GB | Maxtor 200GB/250GB | Memorex 20X DVD/RW | Windows 7 Home Premium 32-bit

 08/25/2013 07:27 AM
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Thanny
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Kingston shows that memory stick matching that motherboard, so it's unlikely that the memory is not compatible.

All the same, one thing worth doing is running Memtest86 and Prime95 with the old processor.  Several hours for the former, at least 10 minutes with the latter.  Do the same with the 8350 if you can (Memtest86 runs off boot image, so no Windows, but Prime95 runs in Windows).

You should also note the type and associated modules (if any) with all BSOD events. 

I'd be leaning towards a faulty CPU, but there are still other variables to rule out.

 

 09/14/2013 03:08 PM
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AMDforMe
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While this is a late response it may help Ruckerduck if he's still having issues or other folks.

Don't re-install the O/S unless you have to as it in itself can cause more issues...

First thing I'd do is re-seat the RAM and all plug in cards, i.e. video, etc. and re-connect all cables to be sure that they are tight. If that doesn't work then you might want to re-seat the CPU.

Since the PC worked fine for awhile and isn't running hot under load, then the next thing I would do is run memtest86+ overnight to check for RAM going bad. I have seen numerous instances of brand name DDR3 RAM failing in a couple weeks to a couple months in recent PC builds. When it was returned and tested by the RAM maker, it was in fact bad RAM.

The above will cure most PC hardware related BSODs. You can stress test with OCCT or Prime 95 to try and isolate any hardware issues. Windows O/Ss have tens of thousands of known Bugs in them that can cause BSOD. Installing new hardware or software can "trigger" one of these Bugs. It's best to be 100% certain that the hardware is reliable via OCCT or P95 testing before chasing Windows O/S issues because chasing both hardware and O/S issues will drive a person insane.



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Technical ignorance is NOT a destiny it is a choice. Do your homework so that you can make technically informed decisions and not be duped by advertising hype or mis-information stated as fact when its not.


 

 09/14/2013 04:39 PM
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MisterEd
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Originally posted by: AMDforMe While this is a late response it may help Ruckerduck if he's still having issues or other folks.

 

Don't re-install the O/S unless you have to as it in itself can cause more issues...

 

First thing I'd do is re-seat the RAM and all plug in cards, i.e. video, etc. and re-connect all cables to be sure that they are tight. If that doesn't work then you might want to re-seat the CPU.

 

Since the PC worked fine for awhile and isn't running hot under load, then the next thing I would do is run memtest86+ overnight to check for RAM going bad. I have seen numerous instances of brand name DDR3 RAM failing in a couple weeks to a couple months in recent PC builds. When it was returned and tested by the RAM maker, it was in fact bad RAM.

 

The above will cure most PC hardware related BSODs. You can stress test with OCCT or Prime 95 to try and isolate any hardware issues. Windows O/Ss have tens of thousands of known Bugs in them that can cause BSOD. Installing new hardware or software can "trigger" one of these Bugs. It's best to be 100% certain that the hardware is reliable via OCCT or P95 testing before chasing Windows O/S issues because chasing both hardware and O/S issues will drive a person insane.

 

I upgrade from a Phenom II 960-T to a an FX-8350. I was also was getting a lot of BSODs. Some were related to Microsoft's DRM detecting a hardware change. Windows Media Center would also no longer play so called protected content. It took several several days to figure out and fix this. I also applied all the Windows patches for Windows AMD FX processors. After all this my PC would still BSOD every day or two. My only option then was to reinstall Windows 7. I no longer had BSODs.



-------------------------

Gigabyte GA-990FXA-UD3 | AMD FX-8350 | Corsair H60 Cooler | GSkill RipjawsX (2x4GB) | ASUS GeForce GTX 560 | WD Caviar Blue 1TB | Seagate 750GB | ASUS 24X DVD/RW| Windows 7 Ultimate 64-bit
ASUS M4N82 Deluxe | AMD Phenom II X4 960T | Corsair XMS2(2x2GB) | PNY GeForce GTS 250 (1GB) | Seagate 300GB | Maxtor 200GB/250GB | Memorex 20X DVD/RW | Windows 7 Home Premium 32-bit

 09/15/2013 04:59 PM
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AMDforMe
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Re-installing Windows with a CPU change may be required but I don't recommend re-installing Windows unless it needs to be as it can cause a lot of issues. I have seen Windows 7 install the AMD FX series drivers with a change in CPUs, without doing a new install so there are a lot of things going on with different versions of Windows with auto scanning of the hardware on boot up.

Ruckerduck was having issues with a system that was running fine for a week and all of a sudden stopped running properly. That's why I suggested the step-by-step diagnosis of the hardware first. I've seen a lot of PC's FUBARed by doing Windows re-installs because there is always residual files that don't get deleted unless you do a "secure" erase of the HDD/SSD before the re-install. The residual data can cause all kinds of headaches down the road.

In addition if it's a hardware issue you can compound the problem by creating an O/S issue based on the above info. I'm glad it resolved your issue and I hope that there aren't any residual files to bite you down the road if you did a std. re-installation of Windows. It's maddening trying to deal with all the issues with Windows...

BTW the latest Win security updates had some issues and folks may need to uninstall the release from 9-10-13 the install the repaired files released 9-13-13, if their system stays in an update loop.



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Technical ignorance is NOT a destiny it is a choice. Do your homework so that you can make technically informed decisions and not be duped by advertising hype or mis-information stated as fact when its not.


 

 09/15/2013 11:39 PM
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MisterEd
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Originally posted by: AMDforMe Re-installing Windows with a CPU change may be required but I don't recommend re-installing Windows unless it needs to be as it can cause a lot of issues. I have seen Windows 7 install the AMD FX series drivers with a change in CPUs, without doing a new install so there are a lot of things going on with different versions of Windows with auto scanning of the hardware on boot up.

 

Ruckerduck was having issues with a system that was running fine for a week and all of a sudden stopped running properly. That's why I suggested the step-by-step diagnosis of the hardware first. I've seen a lot of PC's FUBARed by doing Windows re-installs because there is always residual files that don't get deleted unless you do a "secure" erase of the HDD/SSD before the re-install. The residual data can cause all kinds of headaches down the road.

 

In addition if it's a hardware issue you can compound the problem by creating an O/S issue based on the above info. I'm glad it resolved your issue and I hope that there aren't any residual files to bite you down the road if you did a std. re-installation of Windows. It's maddening trying to deal with all the issues with Windows...

 

BTW the latest Win security updates had some issues and folks may need to uninstall the release from 9-10-13 the install the repaired files released 9-13-13, if their system stays in an update loop.

 

I have never heard of anyone having to wipe the drive before rinstalling Windows unless the drive itself had some fatal problems. For example I have worked on computers that would not boot anymore. The computer would then BSOD while reinstalling Windows. Wiping the drive fixed the problems. I have not had to do this for over 5 years now.

A normal reinstall of Windows will put all the files from the previous installation in Windows.old. None of these files should affect the new installation of Windows. If the user does not care about what was there before he could just reformat the C: drive during the reinstallation of Windows leaving nothing from the previous installation.

Of course I don't recommend anyone reinstall Windows unless aboslutely necessary. Sometimes a person has to make a decision about whether to continue trying to track down problems or just bite the bullet and reinstall Windows.

You should not make this process look harder than it actually is. All it takes thinking ahead. Important information from the C: partition needs to be backed up. The media for the installed software needs to be rounded up. The latest drivers for the hardware need to be found. After that it is no big deal to pop in the Windows DVD and go for it. As long as I plan things right I have never had a problems in the 20 years I have been doing this.



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Gigabyte GA-990FXA-UD3 | AMD FX-8350 | Corsair H60 Cooler | GSkill RipjawsX (2x4GB) | ASUS GeForce GTX 560 | WD Caviar Blue 1TB | Seagate 750GB | ASUS 24X DVD/RW| Windows 7 Ultimate 64-bit
ASUS M4N82 Deluxe | AMD Phenom II X4 960T | Corsair XMS2(2x2GB) | PNY GeForce GTS 250 (1GB) | Seagate 300GB | Maxtor 200GB/250GB | Memorex 20X DVD/RW | Windows 7 Home Premium 32-bit

 09/16/2013 10:09 AM
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AMDforMe
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Unfortunately no, neither a re-install of Windows nor a reformat of the drive removes all of the previous files. A reformat just deletes the data location file so that it appears the drive has no files on it. It doesn't actually delete the files from the drive. When you re-install the O/S you are writing over old files but not necessarily all of the old files. That's where the problems occur. That's why I mentioned the fact a secure erase is the only means to remove all of the residual stuff.

A secure erase is not a big deal and prepares the drive as when it was new. That's the only means to know there is no residual files to cause headaches. Most people are not aware of the above info. and this is why they can end up with issues.

People are free to do whatever makes them happy. My goal is to provide accurate technical information to help people. They can use or discard this information as they see fit.



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Technical ignorance is NOT a destiny it is a choice. Do your homework so that you can make technically informed decisions and not be duped by advertising hype or mis-information stated as fact when its not.


 

 09/16/2013 11:59 AM
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jklein1105
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Deathclaw No it wont. I'm guessing because its an apu that it uses either a F1 or an F2 Socket and a FX8350 is a AM3+ Socket the pins on the bottom of the CPU will not match the oles in the socket. You need an AM3+ socket motherboard.
 09/16/2013 06:34 PM
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MisterEd
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Originally posted by: AMDforMe Unfortunately no, neither a re-install of Windows nor a reformat of the drive removes all of the previous files. A reformat just deletes the data location file so that it appears the drive has no files on it. It doesn't actually delete the files from the drive. When you re-install the O/S you are writing over old files but not necessarily all of the old files. That's where the problems occur. That's why I mentioned the fact a secure erase is the only means to remove all of the residual stuff.

 

A secure erase is not a big deal and prepares the drive as when it was new. That's the only means to know there is no residual files to cause headaches. Most people are not aware of the above info. and this is why they can end up with issues.

 

People are free to do whatever makes them happy. My goal is to provide accurate technical information to help people. They can use or discard this information as they see fit.

 

Sure the data from the old files are still there unless you do a secure erase. However why should that be a problem? A regular format will remove all the directory entries so there is no way for Windows to access them anyways after it is reinstalled. During the Windows reinstallation and afterwards Windows will simply overwrite all the old data eventually. As I said Windows after it has been reinstalled has no way to access any old data files. Even if you do not format C: the old files are in Windows.old. The new Windows install will never try to access anything there.



-------------------------

Gigabyte GA-990FXA-UD3 | AMD FX-8350 | Corsair H60 Cooler | GSkill RipjawsX (2x4GB) | ASUS GeForce GTX 560 | WD Caviar Blue 1TB | Seagate 750GB | ASUS 24X DVD/RW| Windows 7 Ultimate 64-bit
ASUS M4N82 Deluxe | AMD Phenom II X4 960T | Corsair XMS2(2x2GB) | PNY GeForce GTS 250 (1GB) | Seagate 300GB | Maxtor 200GB/250GB | Memorex 20X DVD/RW | Windows 7 Home Premium 32-bit

 09/17/2013 10:36 AM
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AMDforMe
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As I said, you're not eliminating all files nor over writing all files and I have personally seen these residual files cause problems over 20 years of building and repair PCs. This type of problem is also common with GPU driver residuals. That's why they make scrubber software to remove these old files and then the new drivers work fine.

That's why I provided the detailed information to prevent other folks from experiencing these issues. Use it as you see fit.



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Technical ignorance is NOT a destiny it is a choice. Do your homework so that you can make technically informed decisions and not be duped by advertising hype or mis-information stated as fact when its not.


 

 09/17/2013 05:01 PM
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black_zion
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That's why they make scrubber software to remove these old files and then the new drivers work fine.


The problem with those programs such as DriverSweeper is that unless you know what you are doing you can cause major (unbootable) situations. The only times you need to use a driver cleaning program are when you are switching graphics card manufacturers, or when you are reverting to an older driver version. Once upon a time back with Windows XP and before you pretty much had to reformat every time you changed core hardware, but with Windows 7, it is a bit more intelligent.

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AMD FX-8350 w/ Corsair H105, ASUS Sabertooth 990FX Gen3/R2, 8GiB G.SKILL DDR3-2133, XFX HD 7970, 512GB Vertex 4, 256GB Vector, 240GB Agility 3, Creative X-Fi Titanium w/ Creative Gigaworks S750, SeaSonic X750, Corsair C70, HP ZR2440w, Win 7 Ultimate x64
 10/03/2013 03:59 PM
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orn
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So the Op is trying to upgrade a processor with a another processor by merging two processors so that he can have one giant mega ultra booga booga lvl 9000 super CPU,

 

 

 

 

sure why not....

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